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Search Results 0 to 17 of about 18 (some duplicates have been removed)
in india, as well. india will be an economy we will take far greater notice of as the years go by. i agree totally in the decoupling. we are continuing to see that shift in economic power from west to east. we have too just to it. you have to adjust to it. far more severely than we do. it isn't something that is going to go away. but it cannot done and we will do it. but whether it will be deflationary or not, i'm not quite sure. >> meanwhile, howard, if i can just change tax slide, a large part of the rally in europe has been from financials. but we heard from rbs today who added realism. >> yes, they did. it has been an amazing week. yes, we were very glad the it's all over. what a week for banks. the good, the bad and the ugly. well, if the ugly is royal bank of scotland today, then we can actually live through it. but you know, the bottom line is that there's still a massive write-off here. banks are not performing in the way, the manner which they need to. there's a lot of clearing of decks to do and there's a lot of change of strategy still to come. but well done to those like hsbc a
. if we do the decent thing, the nuclear arsenal will be hard. greta: and do what? india is next door. they hate each other. what can we do? >> the military is called the steel skeleton because it is the one institution that holds the country together. we need to make sure does not turn against us. it is not anything we can do in a few days or few months. if we lose the struggle and the radicals takeover, they have dozens or hundreds of nuclear weapons to use against india. the stakes in pakistan are very high, higher than afghanistan or iraq. greta: we hear the nuclear arsenal is safe and under control. i do know why, but i do not feel comfortable with that. can the committee that is true? he was like the walmart and nuclear weapons. he was giving a clear weapons all over the world to north korea, syria. he is a hero in number three. the worst thing they did was give him a house arrest. >> >> i dealt with that when those in the government. from a technical point of view, it is unlikely you will have an accidental detonation of nuclear weapons. greta: i'm not worried about that. >> th
we do? i know the nuclear arsenal is terrifying, and you've got india next door and they hate each other, but what can we do? >> well, i think in pakistan, the military, which the people there are called the steel skelton, because it's the one institution of government that really holds the country together. we have to make sure that does not turn against us. that's not going to be anything we can do in a few days or a few months. it's a long-term proposition. if we lose that struggle, though, and the radicals take over in pakistan, they've got dozens, maybe hundreds of nuclear weapons to use against india or to give the terrorist groups that can be used around the world. the stakes are very high around the world, i think today higher than afghanistan or iraq. >> can you -- i mean, we hear from our government that the nuclear arsenal is safe, that it's under control. i don't know why, but i don't feel comfortable with that. can you convince me that that's true? i know that even a.q. khan, is almost like the devil, like the wal-mart of nuclear weapons. he's giving nuclear weapons al
with a grain of salt. after all, senator cornyn last month raised the specter of the threat from india to justify more funding for the f-22. i mean, in fairness, should have justified the threat from canada given the health care debate. take everything he says and put it in a different perspective. >> but this one is particularly juicy, because he defended data mining without people's knowledge during the bush years, but he's now opposed to voluntary sending of white house e-mails, because they might contain e-mail addresses of people who sent out e-mails full of disinformation. just -- i mean, nobody tapped himd on the shoulder and said this looks really bad, senator? >> you know, put aside the fact that the white house made clear no one's name or address is going to be collected, the point here to respond to the viral lies and misperceptions we know are already out there that are being fed by these various grass roots groups, calling them a nice fame, and that, i think, is a smart strategy from white house. we live in a 24/7 media environment. these viral lies can spread very fast. i
up for canada, brazil, india. how much do you want? the evidence is clear cut, we'll have rising real gdp in practically every significant country in the world in the third quarter. >> where should they go right now? they missed a chunk of this rally, we're still about 40% below the peak of october 2007. do i deare believe we can achiee those peaks and what do we do to get to them. >> they need to define their goals and find what the right asset allocation is for them. if they're 100 answ% in stocks can't afford it, they better zero down. they need to check to see if they don't need to change. they're trying to figure out if the stock market will go up or down for the next month and that will determine what will do with my retirement money. that's crazy, insane. you have to go back, never a wrong time to go to the right asset allocation. stop paying attention to short term fluctuations. >> robert, what's your best short term investment or two? you're in st. louis, if i'm not mistaken. what do you tell the heartland folks and main street investors? >> we like infrastructure. we think b
seng fell 2 1/2%. shanghai composite down 2.9%. india's bombay sensex is down. guy? >> narc, the get go of the session, we were in negative territory. you follow what happened in asia. payroll has changed that all around. you are seeing the futures numbers. you can see it as we speak acro across europe. we've now got most of the main markets trading in positive territory. let me show you the spike we got in the stoxx 600. this is the story, instantaneous reaction to that number. stoxx 600 is trading at a session high here in europe. we are up by 1%. as you can see, most of the morning spent in negative territory. let me talk about some of the stories that aren't moving the market over on our side of the pond. royal bank, very negative today. much more negative than anticipated. it missed on the metrics today with its figures. the real thing that struck the market, though, was the comments that came out of steven, the ceo. i spoke with him first thing this morning. he was much more cautious than lloyd was earlier on this week. he is talking about two years at least in terms of getting th
. host: hobart, indiana. george on the india line. caller: good morning, gentlemen. glad you took my call. i just don't understand for one thing, mr. pappas. how come there is no flexibility between the parties when i have -- my wife and i have two insurance companies, employer insurance companies and we are consumed almost virtually 20% of our gross income, we are not talking about shared costs. or pharmaceutical or anything catastrophic that would happen to us. we are still going to be placed into bankruptcy. why isn't there some sort of consideration? why can't the two chambers of the house come to some sort of compromise to where we are put in a sunset or triggering mechanism to where we could try this new system of universal healthcare coverage? i don't want to use socialism because it is such a key word, a buzzword for a lot of medicaid and medicare people. they think that they are not part of the socialist medicine group. guest: what george just shared with us, i think, is very important and it reminds me of my parents' own situation. my parents live in massachusetts where they ha
arm, pakistan at risk, the potential for confrontation beeen two nuclear armed forces in india and kistan that could result, when you look at all the possibilities o ting this go, and i thi that's got to be clearly made to americans, t not only americans i mean i think no has been woefully uerrepresented in this thing. when we go to, who reay has put boo on the ground and engaged, is the brits, it'she dutch, it's the canadians. ere are the others, you ow, in the 28 nati. >> so that's aery important point abt presidential learship. so how do you -- w do you get them t come around? >> well, i think tha we have to have tse sorts of -i think this is a defining momenfor nato. they shouldn get a pass on this. wasn't just waington and new york that re attacked. it was madrid and it was lond and almost several other capits. and of course the charter ys an attack on one ian attack on all. that is what was, you know, oked in terms of the nato commment. and i don' think we shld be giving passes at, look, u can sort of provi some economic support and you get a pass on putting boots on the
with a nuclear arm, pakistan at risk, the potential for confrontation between two nuclear armed forces in india andd pakistan that could result, when you look at all the possibilities of leting this go, and i think that's got to be clearly made to americans, but not only americans. i mean i think nato has been woefully underrepresented in this thing. when we go to, who really has put boots on the ground and engaged, it's the brits, it's the dutch, it's the canadians. where are the others, you know, in the 28 nation. >> so that's a very important point about presidential leadership. so how do you -- how do you get them to come around? >> well, i think that we have to have these sorts of -- i think this is a defining moment for nato. they shouldn't get a pass on this. it wasn't just washington and new york that were attacked. it was madrid and it was london and almost several other capitals. and of course the charter says an attack on one is an attack on all. that is what was, you know, evoked in terms of the nato commitment. and i don't think we should be giving passes that, look, you can sort o
that was coming out of the state department?" and i think about two weeks ago in india i sat down with hillary clinton. that's when she was talking about the north koreans as unruly children and saying things like that. she also issued an apology to the north koreans. she may not call it an apology, but she basically said "we're very sorry this happened." so i think there were a lot of demands coming from the north koreans. i mean, this is a very serious thing here holding these two journalists. everybody is very happy they were released. but there was a lot of back channel going on and i know evan knows a lot more about that than i do. >> rose: i'm going to get to that. but what is the take on what we gained from clinton's conversation with kim jong il? >> well, they met for about an hour and a half and they had that v.i.p. state dinner. so they certainly didn't talk about just the release of these journalists. i mean, that was pretty much a done deal before he went over there. they wouldn't have gone over there if he didn't believe he was coming back with those journalists. i think president
or india or accepted today, de facto in the nuclear weapons. but the north korean case so different from india or pakistan. this is a smaller -- a small and opaque country, a record of proliferating bad things, whether that's ballistic missiles or nuclear technology. so there's no way that the united states or the world can accept this country as a nike lar weapon state. >> vick to cha, thank you so much for joining us. kiran? oh. >> live out to rob marciano. he's hanging out somewhere on friday. where is he today? he's at the world's largest yardsale. that's right, he's hunting for bargains this morning. there he is. >> what is that? it's some kind of pottery. >> vase or -- >> who knows what he's going to find. >> hello! >> he's going to join us to tell us how they pulled this thing off. >> that looks fantastic. . unlock an outdoor dreamland for your indoor cat. exciting flavor combinations, plus a touch of garden greens make it irresistible. indoor delights. feed the senses. it's the chevy open house. and now, with the cash for clunkers program, a great deal gets even better. let us re
india is here. [applause] and the vice chairman of the d.c. city council, jack evans. [applause] and we have representatives from the embassies of australia, poland, austria, and russia here as well. let me begin this morning by introducing our special guest, dr. romer. as many of you may know, she is chair of the council of economic advisers. that position was established in the employment act of 1946 were it was decided that the president of the united states needed some independent, objective economic analysis and advice. at the time the council was created, it has had not -- some of the most distinguished economists serving in that position. obviously, ben bernanke was there as well. it has had a long history of very distinguished economists. she is one of the best known economists and the country, one of the best known macro economists, served for 20 years at the university -- she became an expert on the depression, the consequences of the depression, and other u.s. government responded. she did a lot of this work with her husband who is also an economist at the university of calif
, the ambassador from india. ambassador shakar's here. [applause] >> and the vice chairman of the d.c. city council, councilman jack evans. and we have representatives from the embassies of poland, australia and russia r russia here as well. -- russia here as well. >> let me begin by introducing our special guest dr. romer. as many of you may no dr. rome is the chair of economic advisors. that position was established by the employment act of 1946 where it was decided that the president of the united states needed some independent objective, economic analysis and advice and from the time that the chair and the council was created in the late 1940's it has has some of the most ex-twinished economies in our country. ar author burns, paul mccraken, ben bernanke and air lan greenspan. dr. romer is certainly within that tradition. she is one of the best known economist in the country, one of the best macro economistists in the country. she served at berkly. and in that position became an expert on the depression, the history of the depression, and the consequences of the depression. she came the leading
be released through cell phones. we have heard a lot about the penetration of cell phones in india and china and africa, where you can go to villages and you create new information markets. the same way, the story that has been told in the u.s. is as you look at schools and literacy, one of the most common factors we find is a lot of the people actually have cell phones. one of the primary means of communication is still through text messaging and figuring out how can we tap into that space? how do we look at the cell networks and communications there to figure out in what context do we think about democracy and the cell phone itself, and not just broadband and the second window? >> one of the challenges we found was that families of low income typically a single mother, might get, that if her kids were not on line and capable of being able to have the skills of producing a video to communicate have the skills of the video literacy and being able to understand how they can access services, that they would have a difficult time being as successful as their peers. we set up an interim program
on time. i first want to acknowledge the presence of several special guests. the ambassador from india is here. and the vice chairman of the d.c. city council, councilman jack evans. and we have representatives from the embassies of australia, portland, austria, and russia, as well. now, let me begin this morning by introducing our special guest, dr. romer. as many of you may know, dr. romer is the chair of the council of the economic advisors. that position was enacted in 1946 when it was decided that the president of the united states needed some independent objective economic analysis and advice. and at the time that the chair was created in the late 1940's, it has had some of the most distinguished members of our
Search Results 0 to 17 of about 18 (some duplicates have been removed)